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20130121
20130129
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
the payments on the national debt, the government's going to be a deadbeat on someing. it's bills to ctrtors, its salary obligations, something will happen and at least we've got that off the table for a few months. >> washington does this all the time. they have these short-term fixes. how do you feel about thoughs? >> it's better than nothing. what is the alternative, a government shutdown as we may be facing at the end of march. so if they keep doing these short-term fixes, at least we're not having a calamity. the problem, of course, is the longer you delay a lot of these things, the harder it gets. >> so put politic as side, what is the solution to this budget and debt cries snis. >> well, you remember bill clinton at theconvention said arithmetic. icomes down to arithmetic. we've got this yawning gap between what the government takes in and what it spends. and realistically you've got to pov both ends this is what president obama calls balance and what the republicans call nonsense because it involves raising taxes. i think you have to do bovment i think you have to have more revenue a
ratings for corporate debt issues. >> tom: it really focuses on the firm's ability to rate government securities and government asset back securities. we spoke with sean egan when the s.e.c. first levied these charges last april. the agency, sean, isn't calling into question your ratings. instead, it's talking about your application itself. what about the information on that application? >> that is the issue, and, according to the s.e.c., we think it's a paperwork issue that we... i w responsible for filling out that form. i fied it out in accordance with our lawyers' guidance. they said, "fill it out as honestly and accurately as possible," and i did. if i had to fill it out again today, i would do exactly the same thing. >> susie: it will be interesting if he really thinks that today in january. unfortunately, egan was not available for comment tonight. >> tom: we have an invitation to him, however, on this first trading day on this shortened trading day. stocks began the shortened trading week by adding to recent gains. the s&p 500 didn't manage to pull itself into positive territo
: are you referring to government spending cuts or or the central bank continuing with the firewa and prectin. >> i was thinking about two things. the program that the b.c. b.has put in place, which has not been taken up. but if it needed to be taken up, i think it should. the other is the progress on the banking union, which is a really important thing. they have taken the first steps, jut the first steps. there is quite a way to go. >> tom: let's talk a little about the united states, because you do address the u.s., and obviously congress and the president keep putting off decisions on spending cuts for america's government budget. how does that postponement impact your forecast? >> we have asmedhat basically the fiscal confrontation for this year will be about 1.25%. it could be worse. the scenario under which it is worse, is the case in which the administration comes in. if administration comes, the cuts in spending, there will be and additional half a percent. i think we have a forecast of 2%, and a decreased goal of 1.5%. >> tom: slow but steady growth in the united states
the u.s. government was teetering on the edge of default, the bond market looked like a good place to hide. and, now that it seems politics are out of the headlines, there's less of a need for investors to hunker down. but, some bond market pros say political risk is not going away for long. they point to the march first deadline for government spending cuts as a reason for investors to come back into bonds. >> it's always hard to parse the dialogue coming out of washington. but, it seems like the republicans want the sequester actually to go forward which would put the breaks on the economy at least to an extent and drive more people back into bonds. >> reporter: others say any return to bonds may be short- lived, as the u.s. economy is showing new signs of strength. >> i think we expect more improvements, moderate improvements. but, you know overall that's usually a cause or thought that rates could go higher. and, in that regard it's probably not a market that will have the same sort of returns that we've seen over the past two years. >> reporter: so, it seems most agree the bon
together between business and government and, you know, i'm optimistic that we'll sort it out but, boy, it sure looks ugly right now. >> susie: for more on michaelportier's research and articles go to nbr.com and check out our partnership with some of the nation's top business schools like harvard. >> tom: while beer wasn't invented in america, u.s. brewers are thinking small to make it big. small craft brewers are claiming a bigger stake of the industry's annual $300 billion in sales. mike hegedus takes us to one small regional brewer on the verge of going national. >> reporter: it is the face of success illuminated by a welders' torch, a german- engineered expansion assembled with bavarian precision. a $10 million project to increase production of-- roll out the barrels, baby, it's beer! this is the lagunitas brewing company operation in petaluma, california, on the edge of bucolic sonoma county pasture land. lagunitas, with 150 employees, is in the sweet spot of the u.s. beer industry. sales by small, regional craft brewers making up for sagging national brand sales. >> it's about p
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)